Theatre

COMING UP

Model Minority
Moving Arts Theater’s MADlab
A nine-month long play development lab that culminates in a public reading in October 2017
mafront_ml2017Synopsis: A comedy in which four sheltered Chinese-American teens want to perform an original rap song for their church’s talent show but none of them know how to DJ. When an African-American student answers their flyer, they all must confront their prejudices. A play about the appropriation of African-American culture by Asian-Americans.

Three Women of Swatow
Tarragon Theatre Playwrights’ Unit
A year long play development that culminates in a public reading in May 2017.
Synopsis: When Mother accidentally kills her husband, three generations of women must come together to solve a bloody situation. This darkly comedic play takes a look at the legacy of abuse, the power of family, and how to prevent the resurrection of a headless chicken.

READINGS/PRODUCTIONS/WORKSHOPS

IMG_3578Issei, He Say (or the Myth of the First)
NNPN/John F. Kennedy Center’s MFA Playwright’s Workshop (July 23-31, 2016)
Written by Chloé Hung
Directed by Mei Ann Teo
Dramaturgy by Jenna Rodgers
Starring: Wei Yi Lin, Glenn Kubota, Jo Mei, and Kenneth Lee
Read more about the 2016 NNPN/Kennedy Center MFA Playwright’s Workshop here
Set in 1969, in a predominantly white suburb of Toronto, Canada, Issei, He Say explores the lives of the Chu family, a new Chinese immigrant family, as they move in next door to a Mr. Yamamoto, a Japanese Canadian man. As Mr. Yamamoto gets closer to each member of the Chu family, he helps them navigate the waters of assimilation while also forcing them to deal with their own prejudices.

Next Stage All Our Yesterdays Poster All Our Yesterdays
Written and directed by Chloé Hung
Next Stage Theatre Festival, January 7-17
Produced by AnOther Theatre Company
When eighteen-year-old Ladi and her younger Asperger’s sister, Hasana, are kidnapped by Boko Haram, they must work together to survive. While Hasana appears oblivious to the dangers of the situation, Ladi must face the guilt she feels of being responsible for her sister.

Reviews
“While All Our Yesterdays is set in the most desperate of circumstances, it has a compelling plot – and is as much about how difficult it is to have a sibling with special needs as its more urgent subject… Hung is a writer to watch.” – 3/4 stars from J. Kelly Nestruck, The Globe and Mail (Jan 8, 2016)
“Hung’s script contrasts these dire scenes with moments from their strained relationship at home”- 3/4 stars from Carly Maga, The Toronto Star (Jan 11, 2016) 
“Playwright/Director Chloe Hung’s writing is especially sharp and the banter between the sisters is littered with witty, tongue-in-cheek quips[…]However, where Hung truly impresses is her ability to comment on larger issues in the dialogue without sacrificing naturalism.” – from Angela Sun, Mooney On Theatre (Jan 8, 2016)

For more information about this show click here!

All Our Yesterdays PosterAll Our Yesterdays
written and directed by Chloé Hung
Toronto Fringe Festival July 1-12, 2015
Produced by AnOther Theatre Company
For more information about this show click here!

Reviews
5/5 Ns “The actors are strong and the direction compelling; you’re sure to be shaken by the ending…A surprise Fringe treasure” – Jon Kaplan from NOW Magazine
All Our Yesterdays is important. Showing how the horrors of the real world can affect two people caught up in them, this is a drama that is both an artistic success and important for the world. On all these grounds, this performance of All Our Yesterdays is a must-see.” – Randy McDonald from Mooney on Theatre

Issei, He Say (or the Myth of the First) Festival of New Works
Festival of New Works, Department of Dramatic Writing
March 6th, 2015 – 7pm Goldberg Theater, 721 Broadway
New York University
Staged reading directed by Kay Long
Starring: Glenn Kubota, Steven Eng, Karen Tsen Lee, and Cleo Gray
Set in 1969, in a predominantely white suburb of Toronto, Canada, Issei, He Say explores the lives of the Chu family, a new Chinese immigrant family, as they move in next door to a Mr. Yamamoto, a Japanese Canadian man. As Mr. Yamamoto gets closer to each member of the Chu family, he helps them navigate the waters of assimilation while also forcing them to deal with their own prejudices.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s